Implementation Guidance

These resources were identified to support the Guidance Document for 505-2-.36 RENEWAL REQUIREMENTS and to help educators maintain and strengthen their effectiveness through the new certification rules, having responsibility for their professional future. The Georgia Professional Standards Commission knows that successful implementation of this new rule involves more than publishing and sharing the printed rule – the human element is recognized. The following information provides all educators with relevant research and resources that support the change process. Exploration, review, and implementation consideration of this information will be beneficial to teachers, teacher leaders, administrators, and central office personnel alike as they shift their professional accountability with the new certification rule changes. Click the link above for access to SEDL’s website focusing on the Concerns-Based Adoption Model, specifically The Stages of Concern component. SEDL recognizes that for a new rule or initiative to succeed, it is critical to address the concerns of the individuals charged with implementing it. The Stages of Concern consists of and describes seven categories of possible concerns related to a new rule or initiative. People who are in the earlier stages of a change process will likely have more self-focused concerns, such as worries about whether they can learn the new rule or how it will affect their job performance. As individuals become more comfortable with and skilled in using the new rule, their concerns shift to focus on broader impacts, such as how the initiative will affect their students or their working relationships with colleagues. The seven different stages are outlined in graphic form, a short video is provided outlining the stages, use and application information is provided, and the research base for the model is listed.
Administrators and Teacher Leaders:
This site and research model is well worth the time you dedicate to it! Stages of Concern allows you to categorize concerns expressed by educators regarding their understanding of the new renewal requirements. The video clip causes you to think about conversations you have had with your teachers and the chart allows you to identify what their concern is (almost quantifying emotion associated with the changes). You may decide to use a Stages of Concern Questionnaire, hold brief interviews, or request open-ended statements that will guide your response and communication to your teachers about the changes and the new rule. This model will cause you to think differently about how you communicate with and LISTEN to your staff as you guide them through the certification rule changes.
Teachers:
If you want to strengthen your reflective process and be prepared to engage in clear dialogue about the new certification rule changes, this resource will help you determine what you know and what you need to know in order to understand and apply the new rule to your professional certificate. You are encouraged to determine which Stage of Concern you are in with understanding the new rule. Follow this link above for access to SEDL’s website focusing on the Concerns-Based Adoption Model, specifically the Levels of Use component. SEDL has developed this tool to allow the educator to look at actual changes in practice – the degree and fidelity with which educators are using and understanding the new rule. Find out if educators are still working through an understanding of the new rule, working through challenges associated with the new rule, or implementing the new rule with professional success. Directly aligned with Stages of Concern, SEDL’s Levels of Use tool identifies eight behavioral profiles that describe the action that educators engage in as they become more familiar with the change in a rule or initiative. The eight levels of use are outlined in graphic form, a short video is provided outlining the stages, use and application information is provided, and the research base for the model is listed.
Administrators and Teacher Leaders:
Used in tandem with the Stages of Concern, you will find this resource an excellent tool in helping you identify your next steps as you implement the new rule or any new initiative. The short video and graphic will guide your conversations with colleagues as you help them process the new rule and how it will impact them and their work with your students. You will be pleased with the simplistic approach to analyzing colleague comments and how you can help them through change.
Teachers:
Scan the Eight Levels of Use graphic and consider your own thoughts about the new rule. Be reflective about your professional and personal goals and how the new rule supports your growth in helping your students. Reviewing the Stages of Concern and Levels of Use together will help your communication with administrators and colleagues as you develop and implement your Professional Learning Plan. Follow this link above and consider “change” through the lens of Michael Fullan. Fullan applauds administrators and educational leaders who recognize change as a process and provides insight on leading cultural change that is sustainable. Fullan explores moral purpose, understanding change, improving relationships, knowledge creation and sharing, coherence making, developing the social environment, learning in context, cultivating leaders at many levels, and enhancing the teaching profession. Fullan believes that educational leaders learn at work when they examine real problems in their own systems.
Administrators and Teacher Leaders:
You will appreciate this concise presentation on how to lead cultural change. As you begin to work with your educators on developing and implementing their Professional Learning Plans, components of this article will guide your thoughts toward a coherent process that allows for district, building, and individual growth.
Teachers:
This is a great article for you to engage with to learn about change. Fullan provides you with a perspective of change as a process that can be guided and supported to promote professional growth. Read the article and share it with your mentor and/or Professional Learning Community; engage in dialogue about how you can promote and support sustainable change through your Professional Learning Plan. Follow this link to an article that holds the key to professionalizing a teacher’s work. Kruse, Seashore Louis, and Bryk discuss the benefits that schools enjoy when they develop professional learning communities. Critical teacher attributes are identified: reflective dialogue, de-privatization of practice, collective focus, collaboration, and shared norms and values. The authors also provide guidance in establishing structural conditions to promote a strong professional community and identify the social and human resources necessary to enhance the community.
Administrators and Teacher Leaders:
You will find this succinct article clearly defines what you need to do to promote and support a strong learning community culture in your building. There are specific steps you need to take in order to meet the structural conditions necessary for an effective professional learning community – you will find these steps in this article. Build it and they will come……..
Teachers:
Empower yourself! What critical attributes do you possess for promoting an effective professional learning community? Read this article to identify your strengths and areas to strengthen through your Professional Learning Plan. Consider the social and human resources presented in the article – how do you collaborate with your colleagues? How can you work collaboratively to improve the effectiveness of your professional community? Reflectively consider the content presented in this article and identify your professional growth areas.